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Posts tagged "Sufficiency"

Circumstantial Evidence Sufficient in Registry Violation

Circumstantial evidence can establish the elements of a crime under Tennessee law and is of no less value than direct evidence in doing so. Either or both may be relied upon by a jury in determining whether the elements of a crime have been proven. The jury decides the weight to be afforded to circumstantial evidence and whether the circumstances are consistent with guilt or inconsistent with innocence. The standard of appellate review is the same, whether the evidence at trial was primarily direct, primarily circumstantial, or a mix of both. In the recent case of State v. Harris, W2013-02310-CCA-R3-CD (Tenn.Crim.App. 6-12-2014), the Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals affirmed a conviction of a sexual offender registry violation where the evidence was partially circumstantial.

Circumstantial Evidence Sufficient in Registry Violation

Circumstantial evidence can establish the elements of a crime under Tennessee law and is of no less value than direct evidence in doing so. Either or both may be relied upon by a jury in determining whether the elements of a crime have been proven. The jury decides the weight to be afforded to circumstantial evidence and whether the circumstances are consistent with guilt or inconsistent with innocence. The standard of appellate review is the same, whether the evidence at trial was primarily direct, primarily circumstantial, or a mix of both. In the recent case of State v. Harris, W2013-02310-CCA-R3-CD (Tenn.Crim.App. 6-12-2014), the Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals affirmed a conviction of a sexual offender registry violation where the evidence was partially circumstantial.

Circumstantial Evidence was Sufficient to Prove Child Abuse

In Tennessee, circumstantial evidence alone may be enough to convict someone of a crime, as long as the evidence is convincing beyond a reasonable doubt. In the recent case of State v. Lambright, M2012-02538-CCA-R3-CD (Tenn.Crim.App. 1-7-2014), the Court of Criminal Appeals found the circumstantial evidence sufficient to sustain jury verdicts of guilt of aggravated child abuse.

Circumstantial Evidence was Sufficient to Prove Child Abuse

In Tennessee, circumstantial evidence alone may be enough to convict someone of a crime, as long as the evidence is convincing beyond a reasonable doubt. In the recent case of State v. Lambright, M2012-02538-CCA-R3-CD (Tenn.Crim.App. 1-7-2014), the Court of Criminal Appeals found the circumstantial evidence sufficient to sustain jury verdicts of guilt of aggravated child abuse.

Circumstantial Evidence was Sufficient to Prove Child Abuse

In Tennessee, circumstantial evidence alone may be enough to convict someone of a crime, as long as the evidence is convincing beyond a reasonable doubt. In the recent case of State v. Lambright, M2012-02538-CCA-R3-CD (Tenn.Crim.App. 1-7-2014), the Court of Criminal Appeals found the circumstantial evidence sufficient to sustain jury verdicts of guilt of aggravated child abuse.

Evidence Sufficient to Affirm Conviction for Rape of a Child

In a criminal trial with conflicting evidence, it is the role of the jury to resolve the evidentiary conflicts and arrive at a conclusion as to guilt or acquittal. On appeal, appellate courts do not consider whether they agree or disagree with the jury's resolution of conflicting facts and evidence. Appellate courts review to determine whether there was evidence from which the jury could reasonably have reached its conclusions of guilt (jury acquittals are not appealable in the United States). In the recent case of State v. Pantaleon, M2012-00575-CCA-R3-CD (Tenn.Criim.App. 4-25-2013), the Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals concluded the evidence was sufficient to support the Defendant's convictions for rape of a child and aggravated sexual battery.

Evidence Sufficient to Affirm Conviction for Rape of a Child

In a criminal trial with conflicting evidence, it is the role of the jury to resolve the evidentiary conflicts and arrive at a conclusion as to guilt or acquittal. On appeal, appellate courts do not consider whether they agree or disagree with the jury's resolution of conflicting facts and evidence. Appellate courts review to determine whether there was evidence from which the jury could reasonably have reached its conclusions of guilt (jury acquittals are not appealable in the United States). In the recent case of State v. Pantaleon, M2012-00575-CCA-R3-CD (Tenn.Criim.App. 4-25-2013), the Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals concluded the evidence was sufficient to support the Defendant's convictions for rape of a child and aggravated sexual battery.

Evidence Sufficient to Affirm Conviction for Rape of a Child

In a criminal trial with conflicting evidence, it is the role of the jury to resolve the evidentiary conflicts and arrive at a conclusion as to guilt or acquittal. On appeal, appellate courts do not consider whether they agree or disagree with the jury's resolution of conflicting facts and evidence. Appellate courts review to determine whether there was evidence from which the jury could reasonably have reached its conclusions of guilt (jury acquittals are not appealable in the United States). In the recent case of State v. Pantaleon, M2012-00575-CCA-R3-CD (Tenn.Criim.App. 4-25-2013), the Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals concluded the evidence was sufficient to support the Defendant's convictions for rape of a child and aggravated sexual battery.

Evidence Sufficient to Support Sexual Battery Conviction

Sufficiency of the evidence of a criminal conviction can be and often is reviewed on direct appeal of that conviction. However, the appellate court does not reevaluate what facts should have been believed or rejected by a jury. It is the function of the jury to make factual determinations from the evidence presented. An appellate court will consider the facts in a light most favorable to the jury verdict, and only review whether there were facts presented upon which the verdict could be based. In the recent Tennessee case of State v. Kromah, M2011-01813-CCA-R3-CD (Tenn.Crim.App. 3-1-2013), the Court of Criminal Appeals reviewed the facts presented at trial to determine whether the evidence was sufficient for the Defendant's conviction of sexual battery by an authority figure. The Court ultimately concluded that it was.

Evidence Sufficient to Support Sexual Battery Conviction

Sufficiency of the evidence of a criminal conviction can be and often is reviewed on direct appeal of that conviction. However, the appellate court does not reevaluate what facts should have been believed or rejected by a jury. It is the function of the jury to make factual determinations from the evidence presented. An appellate court will consider the facts in a light most favorable to the jury verdict, and only review whether there were facts presented upon which the verdict could be based. In the recent Tennessee case of State v. Kromah, M2011-01813-CCA-R3-CD (Tenn.Crim.App. 3-1-2013), the Court of Criminal Appeals reviewed the facts presented at trial to determine whether the evidence was sufficient for the Defendant's conviction of sexual battery by an authority figure. The Court ultimately concluded that it was.

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