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How do criminal charges affect college eligibility?

| May 7, 2020 | Criminal Defense

A criminal conviction results in sentencing that the state or federal courts apply to the convicted. This conviction can range from a fine and community service to time behind bars. If the person who received this conviction is a college student, their education institution may have consequences of their own.

College-aged crimes have seen a rise in recent years, meaning more students may be about to face the additional consequences that a school can give a convicted student. The severity of these consequences can vary, but all of them can change the education opportunities a student has.

On-campus housing

One of the consequences a college can dispense is denying a convicted student access to campus dorms. Denial of residency can put a financial strain on a student, as they would likely need to rent a place off-campus, and their financial aid may not cover the costs of rent.

Deferred suspension

After a conviction, a college may notify their student that they are now under deferred suspension for an amount of time (usually in increments of semesters). During the deferred suspension, if the student violates any specified contingencies, the college will suspend them. A college can choose not to accept any outside credits that the student earned at another college during the suspension.

Expulsion

If a college deems it necessary, they may expel a student. This option is most commonly used in cases involving forced sexual acts, assault, or murder.

Loan denial

Federal loans can take back loans they have offered a student if they receive a conviction, removing any opportunity to continue college education without private loans.

Know the cost

Just because the law has separate sentencing does not mean that colleges cannot apply their own. Any criminal conviction can drastically impact a student’s ability to keep college eligibility or gain eligibility from an institution.

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