If you suspect there is a warrant out for your arrest in Knoxville, it is best for you to make the situation an immediate priority. Ignoring it could lead to law enforcement coming to apprehend you while you are on the job, at your kids’ school or in front of people you do not want to know your business. Although you have the option of waiting until the police come and pick you up, it looks more favorable in the eyes of the law for you to turn yourself in. 

Before you go to the police station, take some time to review the following information on how to handle an arrest warrant to keep the situation from getting out of control. 

Learn the type of warrant 

There are two types of warrants you should concern yourself about. One is a bench warrant. The other is a regular warrant. A judge usually issues a bench warrant when a person misses a mandatory court appearance. Courts often give a regular warrant when a person commits a crime and is not already in custody. 

If you have a regular warrant, the police will either pick you up or allow you to turn yourself in so they can take your fingerprints and formally charge you with a crime. You can usually go home immediately afterward to prepare for trial. If there is a bench warrant out for you, you will sit behind bars after processing until your trial. 

Prepare to turn yourself in 

Depending on the circumstances, law enforcement may not release you right away. Leave your personal effects at home. Try not to take anything with you that you do not mind law enforcement holding onto. Contact your family and inform them of your situation. Make arrangements for bail just in case they hold you over until a judge issues bail. 

Get an attorney 

Because there is a possibility you may not make it back home after turning yourself into law enforcement, you might want to speak to an attorney to learn about plea options. If they hold you over for arraignment, you will need to enter a plea before the judge. The wrong plea could lead to you sitting in jail indefinitely until your trial date. 

It is never a good idea to dismiss a warrant. Even though you may be uncertain about what is to come, you can prepare yourself to ensure the protection of your rights while law enforcement processes you for trial.