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Multiple Offenses Against a Minor Lead to a Sentence of 174 years

When a criminal defendant is convicted of multiple offenses, the trial court must determine whether each of those offenses constitute separate individual crimes. When they do, the trial court, at sentencing, must determine how to align the sentences for those individual convictions. Some circumstances require that sentences be served consecutively to each other. When not required, many circumstances may still exist under which a trial court has the discretion to impose sentences either consecutively or concurrently. In the recent case of State v. Hogg, M2012-00303-CCA-R3-CD (Tenn.Crim.App. 4-16-2013), the Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals upheld a trial court's determination of numerous separate individual offenses and consecutive sentences leading to a total effective sentence of 174 years (132 of them to be served at 100%), arising out of a single sex encounter with a minor.

Multiple Offenses Against a Minor Lead to a Sentence of 174 years

When a criminal defendant is convicted of multiple offenses, the trial court must determine whether each of those offenses constitute separate individual crimes. When they do, the trial court, at sentencing, must determine how to align the sentences for those individual convictions. Some circumstances require that sentences be served consecutively to each other. When not required, many circumstances may still exist under which a trial court has the discretion to impose sentences either consecutively or concurrently. In the recent case of State v. Hogg, M2012-00303-CCA-R3-CD (Tenn.Crim.App. 4-16-2013), the Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals upheld a trial court's determination of numerous separate individual offenses and consecutive sentences leading to a total effective sentence of 174 years (132 of them to be served at 100%), arising out of a single sex encounter with a minor.

Multiple Offenses Against a Minor Lead to a Sentence of 174 years

When a criminal defendant is convicted of multiple offenses, the trial court must determine whether each of those offenses constitute separate individual crimes. When they do, the trial court, at sentencing, must determine how to align the sentences for those individual convictions. Some circumstances require that sentences be served consecutively to each other. When not required, many circumstances may still exist under which a trial court has the discretion to impose sentences either consecutively or concurrently. In the recent case of State v. Hogg, M2012-00303-CCA-R3-CD (Tenn.Crim.App. 4-16-2013), the Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals upheld a trial court's determination of numerous separate individual offenses and consecutive sentences leading to a total effective sentence of 174 years (132 of them to be served at 100%), arising out of a single sex encounter with a minor.

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